Major depression is an illness that can be treated. It stands as one of the most common psychiatric disorders, and affects about one in six people. The World Health Organization ranks depression as one of the top causes of suffering and disability world wide, yet effective treatment is available.

Our research program is focused on improving treatments for depression. Many of our projects examine how depression affects brain function, how brain activity changes when a person is being treated, and how this information might be used to provide more effective care for people with depression. Additionally, we are involved with developing and evaluating new treatments for depression.

Our clinical research projects are currently open for enrollment. Please call us at 310-825-3351 to talk with someone about participating, or for more information, please look at the PDF files of our flyers for:

  • Synchronized TMS (sTMS), a new form of magnetic stimulation for depression which has not responded to a trial of medication (age 22-65) (experimental treatment)
Other studies have closed, but new ones will be launched soon -- please check back often


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Do I have Clinical Depression?

You may wish to test yourself with the questions on one of these questionnaires:
the QIDS-SR16, the 16-question Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (en español)
or the PHQ-9, the 9-question Patient Health Questionnaire. (en español).

Some people choose to print out their answers and share them with their own doctor, as a way to start the discussion of how to feel well again; for their own safety, people with thoughts of harming themselves should proceed to the nearest emergency room, with the help of others if needed.

More about preventing suicide and self-destructive behaviors from the American Psychiatric Association

 

We are pleased to announce that UCLA is now able to offer treatment for depression with the latest FDA-approved device, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation therapy or TMS. Please see TMSLosAngeles.com for more information or call us at 310-825-7471, our TMS hotline. Our work with this treatment was covered in this video segment on KABC-TV. This other video segment offers a patient's perspective on receiving TMS. Dr. Cook is a member of the rTMS Task Group of the National Network of Depression Centers.



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Copyright © 2005-2012 Ian A Cook MD, Director of the UCLA Unipolar Depression Research & Clinic Program, and
Associate Director of the UCLA Laboratory of Brain, Behavior, and Pharmacology, All Rights Reserved